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dilantin vs. phenyton arghh


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#1 Mchild

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Posted 25 May 2005 - 03:46 PM

Dilantin is still a mind altering drug, it just controls seizures. Although it runs the risk of liver disease it has been the only thing we ever found to control my seizures. I havent had a grand mal seizure since I was 13 although I almost came close the other day. Luckily the meds stopped it.
Phenyton is dilantins evil twin. State recognizes it as same thing grrr.....When I was on it before I had seizures and I wasnt having any at the time. But since it controls some peoples seizures they see it as good enough for everyone. :x :x :x :x :x
Anyone ever have bad experience with phenyton or am I just a weirdo?lol

#2 tiggervet

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Posted 25 May 2005 - 05:26 PM

(((((mchild)))))

Actually, Dilantin *is* phenytoin, Dilantin is just the brand name of the original drug approved by the FDA. If you're prescribed "phenytoin" rather than "dilantin", it's because you've been given the generic. That's why the govt says they're the same - you'd get the same answer from just about anyone, including insurance companies and pharmacists.

Unfortunately, generic drugs are NOT identical to the branded drugs - they have the same active ingredient, but are not always formulated the same. As a result, MOST people have no problem substituting the generic for the brand name, but SOME will not get the full effect. My husband ran into this same thing when the insurance company substituted generic escitalopram for Celexa - the generic flat-out didn't work for him.


sorry you are fighting this battle.

#3 Mchild

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Posted 26 May 2005 - 05:25 PM

This explains the difference. I just found it.

The Article is called: Phenytoin (Dilantin ® for the Treatment of Epilepsy)

Here is the Excerpt which addresses the difference between the brand name and the generic:

"Generic Drugs:

"Drug companies spend millions of dollars developing a new drug. To compensate them for taking this risk, governments give the company the right to monopolize the manufacture and distribution of the drug for a certain number of years. The drug company is also allowed to give the drug a unique name that can be trademarked. Once trademarked, that name cannot be used by any other corporation. This is called the trade name. Every drug also has a chemical, or generic name which anyone can use. Dilantin<SUP></SUP> is the trade name used by Parke-Davis Inc. for the generic drug phenytoin.

"After the period of monopoly has passed, any chemical manufacturer can produce the drug and market it under the generic name. Only the original manufacturer can market the drug under the trade name. In an ideal world, both drugs are identical and for many types of medications, the generic version is just as safe and effective as the trade name version. Since generic drugs are usually less expensive than the trade name version, they are attractive alternatives for trade name medication. Many insurance companies will only pay for generic drugs when they are available.

"This is not the case for Dilantin<SUP></SUP>. Generic phenytoin is not absorbed from the digestive system into the blood in the same way as Dilantin<SUP></SUP> capsules. Because of the way the liver metabolizes Dilantin<SUP></SUP>, the mechanism of drug absorption affects the blood level. With generic phenytoin the blood level can vary significantly throughout the day causing either side effects or rendering it ineffective in preventing seizures. This means you may have to take more total generic drug several times a day, thus increasing the cost. Many insurance companies recognize this problem and allow exceptions to their generic only rules for Dilantin<SUP></SUP>. The choice of whether to take a generic phenytoin or Dilantin<SUP></SUP> should be discussed with your doctor." :o :o :o :o :o

#4 verysadcat

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Posted 26 May 2005 - 08:34 PM

:o wow!

and here I've spent my whole life assuming that generics were the exact same thing as the original! just cheaper!

good luck getting back your dilantin, sweetie.

Di

#5 MikeInVa

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Posted 20 March 2008 - 08:54 PM

(((((mchild)))))

Actually, Dilantin *is* phenytoin, Dilantin is just the brand name of the original drug approved by the FDA. If you're prescribed "phenytoin" rather than "dilantin", it's because you've been given the generic. That's why the govt says they're the same - you'd get the same answer from just about anyone, including insurance companies and pharmacists.

Unfortunately, generic drugs are NOT identical to the branded drugs - they have the same active ingredient, but are not always formulated the same. As a result, MOST people have no problem substituting the generic for the brand name, but SOME will not get the full effect. My husband ran into this same thing when the insurance company substituted generic escitalopram for Celexa - the generic flat-out didn't work for him.


sorry you are fighting this battle.


I know the feeling as I've been on dilantin for siezures since 1993 but about a year ago my doc gave me a refill on a year's supply for the generic & it caused my level to drop big time.I'm now back on the name brand but I'm still upset with the Walmart pharmacist who told us that dilantin & it's generic form were the same thing when clearly they're not.