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#1 marga

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Posted 29 December 2005 - 02:58 PM

Not sure if this is the right folder, as it's more of a self-help thing. Anyway, I was wondering if anyone here does CBT (either with a therapist or from self-help books) and if they'd be interested in a thread where we could share techniques and ideas, help each other out when we get stuck, etc?

#2 Sunshineinmyface

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Posted 29 December 2005 - 05:40 PM

I went to a therapy group, the main focus of which was CBT. I will now be using CBT with my individual therapist. I really like the stuff...lots of authors out there. I think Burns if the most popular currently.

I would very much be interested in a thread about CBT. So shall this be it?

Sunshine

#3 marga

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Posted 29 December 2005 - 05:53 PM

This shall be it :D

I have Feeling Good by David Burns. I'm finding it very useful at the moment, though there's so much stuff in there, it's a bit overwhelming. Mostly I use Mind Over Mood cos that's what we used in our therapy group.

I'm about to leave work now (yay!!) but I'll post more tomorrow.

#4 jillie

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Posted 29 December 2005 - 06:47 PM

I think this is a really good idea to have a thread where we can exchange CBT ideas and techniques :D Personally, my only experience is from the David Burn's book, but I have found it useful when I have hit a difficult time.

I am making this thread a sticky so we don't lose it!

love Jillie xxxxxxxx

#5 Samantha

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Posted 29 December 2005 - 06:54 PM

I think it's a great idea!

Love,

Sam

#6 Sunshineinmyface

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Posted 30 December 2005 - 05:06 AM

I have found a web site that says it will give a person that registers, free of cost, if one takes a depression test, then free CBT sessions. The site is: www.depressionCenter.net/ I think i will check it out. I will report back of course.

#7 marga

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Posted 30 December 2005 - 05:15 PM

Sunshine, you'll have to let us know what that site is like :) If it's decent it could be a fantastic resource.

Here are a few links I have, which are CBT exercises online:

The Ten Forms of Twisted Thinking
Ten Ways to Untwist Your Thinking
These are both from the Feeling Good Handbook by David Burns. The second one's a bit sketchy and I think it must be a summary of techniques he explains in more detail elsewhere in the book.

The Five Steps
For use in a crisis.

Using Rational Emotive Therapy to Control Anger
Technically this one's RET rather than CBT, but I think they're very similiar.

CBT for Depression
This one's about scheduling activities that you enjoy or that you get a sense of achievement from.

Hope they help!

#8 Sunshineinmyface

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Posted 30 December 2005 - 08:12 PM

Marga,

Thank you for the links and the explaination. Interestingly enough I found that site when i was looking into whether i had a Borderline Personality Disorder, as one pdoc said, and he turned out to be a quack. But the treatment for Borderline and Post traumatic stress are CBT. CBT works for depression and anxiety and Bipolar too.

I just wish it were taught in school it is so grounded in reality and helpful.

I agree that some of the challenges to negative thinking are a bit vague and impractical. Take what you can use and leave the rest.

The cognitive distortions are very important to become familiar with, in my opinion. Since learning them i have not looked at things the same. I think those are valid and with work can be challenged successfully and eliminated. When they pop up one can identify it right away in their own thinking or someone elses.

I will look at the things you have linked and perhaps we can have a discussion or something?

Thanks for putting in the work.

Sunshine

#9 marga

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Posted 01 January 2006 - 09:22 PM

Yep, CBT's good for just about anything :D I don't have BPD myself either but have found that site very helpful.

I'd love to discuss things. I don't have a therapist right now (well, I just started seeing a private psychologist but I can only afford to see him once a month, and I'm not sure if I'm gonna stick with him since we didn't really gel... I'll have to wait and see). Sometimes I get stuck on CBT stuff and it's good to have someone else to talk to about it.

#10 Sunshineinmyface

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 09:20 PM

For those interested and new to CBT who many not be familiar with it I try to briefly explain the theory below while also explaining how the depression center site session teach CBT.

At www.depressioncenter.net there are 16 sessions (they advise doing one per week) teaching Cognative Behavioral Therapy (CBT), which can be a very effective therapy for many people. Very simply, CBT tries to correct negative thoughts by teaching a person to become aware of and identify the negative thoughts, and resulting feelings and behaviors. One is taught to counter negative thoughts.

The theory and the reality of CBT is that by being aware and identifying the negative thoughts they can be countered and eliminated. An absence of negative thoughts means an absence of distressful feelings connected with them. This worked for me and still does. It does take a serious effort and lots of being patient because this must be done over and over....the countering. Why? Say for example you are like me and was mistreated as a child and naturally developed negative thoughts. The mistreatment happened over and over again -otherwise it would not have had the effect the abuser wanted. Since the creation of the negative thoughts took repetition and time so does the countering.

Changing is a very difficult thing. Changing behavior, habits, ect are difficult. Changing thoughts is just as difficult if not more difficult. People resist change even when they are in a miserable distressful situation. People hypothosize about why this is. However, if one does want to eliminate useless and harmful negative thoughts it can be done. One must be patient and persistant. One must give oneself credit and reward for each step taken.

Another part of the therapy is to change behavior. Once the thoughts are gone the behavior must be changed too. For example, when one is depressed they want to isolate and do not take pleasure in the things they did before and may not even be taking basic care of themselves. I have been there. CBT asks you to be brave and to do pleasurable things, even though you may not get pleasure out of them because thoughts will follow behavior. Should one be persistent and keep doing pleasureable things the work on negative thoughts will be occuring while you do these behaviors, such as fear going out or it doesn't matter or people will think i am strange. By doing the behavior despite the thoughts you are refuting the thoughts when your biggest fear does not occur. The fear is a distortion created by the depression beast and is not accurate.

In CBT you are working on changing thoughts and behaviors at the same time.

The site is set up for participants to do one session per week so serious work can be done on what is taught and time can be given to the home work, such as keeping track of your emotions or negative thoughts, or an activities schedule. The homework reinforces the lesson taught in the session.

Each week you will take a depression test to determine your level of depression and the site keeps this information for you to access should you want to. Additionally, each week the site asks you to list your meds and asks questions about your mood.

As you get into the sessions there are questions about how you used the homework tool (i.e.emotion journal or what negative thoughts you
identified having over the last week).

There is a support group on the site, which you can used to support your efforts, ask questions about CBT, or share experiences.

When the session requests you do homework there are printable forms for schedules of moods or activities or whatever the home work is.

The sessions ease you into the theory and in my opinion the content is good and the method is good too. As good as it can be without having face to face therapy.

I sped through the sessions to see how good the sessions were as I have taken CBT before. The teaching is in line with what i have learned in therapy about CBT and read about CBT. A good source for reading is Burns, I think his first name is John but i do not recall - mind fart - he has written several books using CBT techniques and for my money his latest book is the best.

I hope this helps someone who is having distressful thoughts and wants to get out of the cluches of the beast. I would encourage anyone interested to give it a go and see how it goes for you. Let us know on this sticky your thoughts about the experience.

Peace and Love or is it Peach and Live,
Sunshine

#11 marga

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Posted 04 January 2006 - 10:40 PM

A good source for reading is Burns, I think his first name is John but i do not recall - mind fart

David Burns. And I recommend him too :) I think his books can be a bit overwhelming if you're very depressed, and in that case Mind Over Mood (by Greenberger and Padesky) is also a very good book which is simpler to follow, though not as comprehensive.

I'm gonna check out that website :D

#12 marga

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Posted 11 January 2006 - 02:49 PM

I've signed up for the CBT sessions at depressioncenter.net. They seem very good so far. Does anyone want to join me and do this thing together? So far I've recruited two people from Sirius...

#13 marga

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Posted 16 January 2006 - 03:06 PM

I've found another CBT website:
http://www.paniccenter.net

It's basically the same as the Depression Center site, and by the same people, except that it's for panic attacks rather than depression and the programme's only 12 weeks long.

I don't get panic attacks myself, but thought it might be useful for some people. :D

#14 Sunshineinmyface

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 08:11 AM

bump for those who said they maybe interested and to those I suggested a look


Sunshine

#15 dgibson

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Posted 18 September 2011 - 01:01 PM

I have used Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for quite some time. It is extremely really useful for a variety of things in my opinion. I used it for both anxiety and depression and even panic attacks. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy really helped me restructure my thinking where I learned and embraced healthier beliefs. Much of my inspiration to use Cognitive Behavioral came from Dr. David Burns, M.D. His site is:
http://feelinggood.com
The first book I read by Dr. Burns was Feeling Good. This was life changing for me. Two very helpful things for me were reading about the experiences of other sufferers and their recovery. In addition to Dr. Burns’ site, the site algy.com is another useful site. Another site that contains a lot of examples of cognitive behavioral therapy in real life examples is below:
http://panicattackrecovery.com
I think there is a vast amount of improvement that can happen when people begin to restructure their thinking. That was my experience. Hope this helps. Does anyone have any further sites that they would recommend for panic attacks, specifically using Cognitive Behavioral Therapy? I find real life examples the most helpful. Any responses/comments would be appreciated.