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Books - Informational/Self-help


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#1 Hangingon

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Posted 20 December 2003 - 02:29 PM

Just wanted to share with you all some books that have made a difference to me in my recovery process........ Things I have read throughout struggling with depression...........

The Luckiest Girl In the World - Novel by Steven Levenkron

Cutting - Understanding and overcoming self mutilation - Steven Levenkron

A Bright Red Scream - Self Mutilation and the Language of Pain - Marilee Strong

The Courage to Heal - A guide for Woman Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse - Ellen Bass and Laura Davis

The Angry Heart - Overcoming Borderline and Addictive Disorders - Joseph Santoro

I Never Told Anyone - Writings by Women Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse - Ellen Bass and Louise Thorton

What you REALLY need to know about living with depression - Robert Buckman

Feeling Good - The New Mood Therapy - David D Burns, M.D.

The Right To Innocence - Healing The Trauma of Childhood Sexual Abuse - Beverly Engel

Guess this explains why I haven't been able to read regular books lately........ :oops:

All very good books that I certainly would recommend to anyone here! Would be interested to see if anyone has any to add here........ I have found out that the best person to help me cope and deal with life is me..... My therapist has been able to point me in the right direction, but found out I really needed to do the work to get here.

Love

Sheila

#2 tired

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Posted 20 December 2003 - 04:19 PM

For Family members- The Prozac Diaries and Girl Interupted. My mother is getting BOTH for christmas. I can't tell her these things and the feelings the characters in the books have are so like what i feel. i'm hoping thse will help her to get it.

** sorry that should be Prozac Nation NOT Diaries, oops

tired

#3 bee

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Posted 20 December 2003 - 05:25 PM

((((((( Sheila )))))))
I'm so glad that you are helping you !!!
I have the courage to heal , have had it for about 3 1/2 years and yest to get half way through it :oops: , I have one on SI but I can't remember what it is called cause it is hidden at home .

Tired,
I love the movie Girl Interupted, I have watched it over and over again that I have lost count how many times I have seen it, I feel like I relate so much to the characters .

justbee

#4 Hangingon

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Posted 21 December 2003 - 02:32 AM

Ohhh,

LOVE Girl Interrupted too!!!!! :D Have also watched it countless times.......

And WTG Tired on trying to get your mom to understand. :?:

Bee - Courage to Heal IS a big ass book........... *** Sigh *** Felt like an eternity passed before I waded through it. LOL, almost cried when it came in at the post office it was sooooooooo big.

Also have read now that I think about it

Stop Walking on Eggshells - Coping When Someone You Care about Has Borderline Personality Disorder - Paul T. Mason, Randi Kreger, Larry J. Siever

Love

Sheila

#5 Jellycat

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Posted 22 December 2003 - 07:35 AM

Phew sheila, thats a lot of books!!!

i have finished reading a good book which I recommend. Its a good description of what it is like to be suffering from depression and I think the author describes recovery very well. Only peolpe with depression who are recovering will relate fully to how we can feel better by small simple feelings, such as hope, feeling more positive and that the greyness has lifted for example.


The Beast, a journey through depression-Tracy Thompson

i liked 'Bright Red scream' too....Im always dipping into it.

another book I am reading now is 'Calm for Life' by Paul wilson which is helping me concentrate on the present and not dwell on the past or future so much, its a book about how to relax and achieve peace of mind mainly by meditative techniques and positive thinking!

love Jellyxxxx

#6 Crazed Gardener

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Posted 23 December 2003 - 02:37 AM

I have read The Beast as well, and it is a fantastic book. Tracy has enormous courage in fighting the beast.

Listening to Prozac by Peter Kramer gives you a lot to think about, although I did find some of it hard to follow (not being a research scientist).

CG

#7 Hangingon

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Posted 23 December 2003 - 02:34 PM

Wild Jelly,

:oops: Yup, is a lot of books when you list em all out like that isn't it? Feeds the hunger in my overactive mind I guess. Figured I might as well try to put it to good use.

Shall have to check out both of those books! :D

:wave: Hey CG! Thanks for popping in to give input.

Love

Sheila

#8 searching_for_myself

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Posted 23 December 2003 - 03:36 PM

Hi all,

this is a book that my therapist suggested to me last week. i haven't gotten it yet, but i was just wondering if anyone here has read it and what they thought of it---

Feel the Fear - Do it Anyway : by Susan Jeffers

thanks,

searching

#9 Xochi

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Posted 24 December 2003 - 07:10 AM

I Never Told Anyone - Writings by Women Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse - Ellen Bass and Louise Thorton


This has been on my booklist for a loooong time. Can't seem to find it anywhere (though I do tend to forget about it when I'm book shopping).

Xochi


#10 Hangingon

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Posted 25 December 2003 - 09:41 PM

Xochi,

Try Amazon.com........... I've been ordering most of my books on-line. I too tend to forget what I wanted once I actually get out shopping.......... :oops:

SFM,

No, have not read or heard of that one. Also try Amazon.com, they do give some good book reviews there to give you an idea if it's worth your while or not to sink the money into it!

Love

Sheila

#11 Sunshineinmyface

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Posted 15 February 2006 - 05:45 AM

Posted Image

BtB Bunch:

I thought I could post about this very interesting book reveiwed by the National Assoc. of Mental Illness in their Connection Newsletter and at the same time hopefully get folks to post books they have read and enjoyed with a review/critique whether the book is about mental illness or some thing else entirely. Can be fiction and/or non-fiction.

A Mind Apart (non-fiction)
Winston Churchill had a mental illness as did William Blake, Vincent van Gogh, Virginia Woolf, Georgia O'Keefe, Sylvia Plath, and many other creative, inventive people throughout our history. A new book argues that without such neurodiverse people, our world would be a less vibrant place and that the human species would find it more difficult to survive and adapt.
A Mind Apart: Travels in a Neurodiverse World by Susanne Antonetta examines how neuroatypicals people with disassociative disorder, autism, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and other neurological disorders see the world and how the world sees them.

Posted Image

Taming your Gremlin (non-fiction) by Rick Carson Unique and light approach to taming negative thinking. He has a website:www.tamingyourgremlin.com and I highly recommend this book for reading when you are not depressed and when you are depressed, he takes into consideration inability to concentrate and remember and the book is interactive. Short but good.

Posted Image

#12 Enigma

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 04:41 PM

I will definately read that. It does sound interesting. Thanks for the recommendation.

#13 crazy diamond

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Posted 17 March 2006 - 02:37 PM

Hi,

I'm currently using "Mind over Mood' by Greenberger and Padesky - It's all about Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. Not far through it but has already made me sit down and seriously think about my thought patterns. It's been giving pretty good write ups.

Joanne x

#14 jude

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Posted 05 April 2006 - 07:07 PM

"Breaking the Chain of Low Self Esteem"
"Breaking the Patterns of Depression"
"Maximum Self Esteem"
"Feeling Good, the New Mood Therapy"

What I like about these books is that they don't tell you how you feel and don't patronize; they reveal and offer solutions.

Edited by jude, 08 May 2006 - 12:41 AM.


#15 Crazed Gardener

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Posted 16 April 2006 - 09:57 AM

Just finished A Mind Apart a cople of weeks ago (thanks, Sunshine!), and it was an excellent and fascinating read. What also interested me were the blurbs on the back cover - there were 3 different ones, all by people who were "neuro diverse".

#16 crazy diamond

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Posted 24 April 2006 - 12:12 AM

Got a copy of "Feeling Good by David Burns" at the weekend. Therapist suggested on my last visit. I've not put it down. It's easy to read, put in simple english, not all pyschiatric terms which is sometimes difficult to take in. If your having difficulty with negative thought patterns then this will make a big difference and give you a real understanding of what's happening with your thoughts/emotions.

Joanne

#17 NJCat

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 01:52 AM

I'm now starting to read "Practicing the Power of NOW" by Eckhart Tolle.

I think it's a smaller version of a bigger book he wrote (called just "The Power of Now").

My problem is: I can't stop thinking. And it's all negative. My mind keeps going and going and there is constant chatter inside my head and not a moment of peace.

I find the first chapter very interesting and am planning on finishing the book. So far I've learned of a technique that helps you remember that you are not totally defined by your mind. The technique is: to hear and listen to the chatter in your mind, but just observe it, without judgment, to just be a witness to it. That way you are not letting your mind define you.
Maybe I didn't explain that well.

But I'm trying to do as the book suggests and it's kind of helping a little.

Other suggestions the author gives are the ones most of us has heard of: concentrate on your breathing, or paying close attention to the little things that you are doing (like washing your hands or anything that would create a "gap" in your stream of thought. Kind of like meditation.

Anyway, the book is small and I'll let you all know how I like the rest of it. :)

#18 marga

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 11:07 AM

I can't believe I haven't replied to this thread before! :)

I've read countless books on depression and related issues, too many to list here, so I'll stick to the five that I feel have helped me most.

Depressive Illness: The Curse of the Strong by Tim Cantopher
This is the book that finally persuaded me depression is an illness and I'm not weak for having it! It convinced me of the need to be kind to myself and not push myself too hard.

Mind Over Mood by Dennis Greenberger and Christine Padesky
A CBT self-help book - teaches you coping skills and ways of challenging negative thoughts. We used it in my therapy group. It's nice and easy to follow.

How I Stayed Alive When My Brain Was Trying to Kill Me by Susan Rose Blauner
This book is about coping with suicidal thoughts and feelings, and a lot of it could apply to SI too. It's a bit cheesy, but if you can get past that, there are some really good ideas in here.

The Anxiety and Phobia Workbook by Edmund Bourne
Lots of self-help stuff for anxiety disorders. I liked that it was strong on GAD which many books seem to gloss over. I also liked the chapter on assertiveness.

When Things Fall Apart by Pema Chodron
This is a Buddhist book but you don't have to be Buddhist to get something out of it (I'm not). It helped me to accept the way I feel without constantly fighting it.

Also, if anyone is in the same position as me of being the partner of a sexual abuse survivor, I highly recommend Allies in Healing by Laura Davies. That book has been like my Bible through all the ups and downs of our relationship - lots of info on abuse and how it affects people, as well as advice on how to cope as a partner.

Marga xx

#19 Shezz

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Posted 23 April 2007 - 04:24 AM

Best 2 books I have come across are Panic Away and TMJ No More - both ebooks.

I swear by these books, I have not had a full blown panic attack since reading panic away and my TMJ was so bad I was ruining all my teeth and end up spending thousands of dollars at the dentist. The TMJ No More book was the first thing I came across that finally helped my TMJ.

I can't recommend these 2 books highly enough, they are brilliant.

www.panicaway.com

www.tmj-no-more.com

They are the websites if anyone would like to check them out :cunning: Posted Image

#20 Eleven

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Posted 20 June 2007 - 03:01 AM

This may sound strange, but a book I have found really helpful is "The Inner Game of Tennis" by Timothy Gallway. It is a really insightful book into the way our minds works, how we learn new behaviours, and how our attitude and thinking can stop us from learning new behaviours, and keep us stuck in old ones, no matter how hard we try to change.
I know for me I used to despair a lot, and become very frustrated when I felt like I was trying really hard to change, but I never seemed to get anywhere. This book has helped a lot with that.
And, yes, it is about tennis, but it can be applied to any activity or persuit -phisical or mental - that requires a change in thinking and behaviour in order to progress and reach your potential.


And two books I have found invaluable in understanding my condition are "Our Iner Conflicts" and "Neurosis and Human Growth" by Karen Horney. These are psychoanalytical texts rather than self help, and her theories are kind of complex, but they have helped me to understand the underlying faults in my thinking and beleifs that contribute to my depression and anxiety.

Edited by Eleven, 20 June 2007 - 03:07 AM.